Monday, May 26, 2014

My Writing Process Blog Tour

Patricia Gligor

I'd like to thank author, Evelyn Cullet, for inviting me to participate in the "My Writing Process Blog Tour." She's asked me to answer four questions and here are my responses.

What am I working on?

My current WIP (work in progress) is the fourth book in my Malone Mystery series. Unlike the first three books, Mixed Messages, Unfinished Business and Desperate Deeds, which are set in Cincinnati, this book will take place on Fripp Island, SC. My main character, Ann Kern, and her two children, Danielle and Davey, will take a much needed vacation to visit Ann’s sister, Marnie. But, since mystery seems to follow Ann everywhere, this trip might not offer the peace and quiet Ann’s hoping for.

How does my work differ from others of its genre?

One reviewer referred to my books as “uniquely different.” While I strive to create an intriguing plot, my series is most definitely character driven. Psychology has always fascinated me. Why do people say and do what they say and do? I want my readers to know and understand the motivation behind each character’s words and actions. I’ve come to love and understand my characters and I hope my readers will too.

Why do I write what I do?

Some of the best advice on writing I’ve ever gotten was to “write in the genre you love to read.” I took that advice and, like most writers, I hope to entertain my readers and to offer them escape from their everyday world. 
But I have another reason for writing what I do; I have a message to deliver. There’s something I feel compelled to share and I choose to do that through my books because I know that fiction can often make a point in a way that non-fiction can’t. If the writer incorporates it into their story rather than belaboring the point. 
You see, David, Ann Kern’s husband, is an alcoholic and his ongoing struggle with alcoholism is a sub-plot in my series. I’ve known some wonderful people who happen to be alcoholics and I believe it’s important for everyone to learn more about alcoholism and to know that there is help available for alcoholics and for the people who love them.

How does my writing process work?

This question put a smile on my face (and made me giggle) because, although I love the motto “Keep it simple” and I try to live that way even in our complicated world, my writing process is anything but simple. I am a plotter! Make that a Plotter with a capital P! 
I have an idea, I jot it down on a scrap of paper, I develop it over the course of time and, eventually, all those scraps of paper turn into a basic outline for the book. From there, I create a chapter-by-chapter outline which highlights what absolutely MUST take place in each chapter. 
Once I’m satisfied with the outline, I begin to write. I try to stay true to the outline but, often, other ideas come to mind and/or my characters refuse to cooperate. So, the outline isn’t “written in stone.” It’s more of a guideline to keep the story moving forward and to make sure I've "covered all the bases." The interesting thing is that, try as I might (I’d love to be a pantster), I can’t write more than a page without my outline.

I've invited these authors to participate in the blog tour and they have graciously accepted. Please be sure to visit their blogs on June 2nd.


 
Anne K. Albert
Anne K. Albert has taught high school art, sold display advertising for a weekly newspaper, and worked for a national brand water company, but now writes full time. When not at the keyboard, the award winning author enjoys traveling and house and petsitting with her high school sweetheart husband (22 countries to date), visiting friends and family, and of course, reading on "Threegio" her cherished and much beloved Kindle.
Her novels include:

Defending Glory, book 1 of the Piedmont Island Romantic Suspense series 

Frank, Incense and Muriel, first book of the Muriel Reeves Mystery series 

Love & Just Desserts, a delightful collection of short stories 

  Holli Castillo

Holli Castillo is a Louisiana appellate public defender and former New Orleans prosecutor. She received a JD from Loyola Law School in 1996 and a BA in Drama from UNO in 1990.
The publication of her first novel, Gumbo Justice, winner of the 2011PSWA award for Best Published Novel, was delayed when she was involved in a head-on collision with a drunk driver and incapacitated for a year. Her second novel, Jambalaya Justice, won the 2011 PSWA award for Best Unpublished Novel. The third installment, Chocolate City Justice, is scheduled for release in 2014. She is also an award-winning screenwriter.
Holli resides in the metropolitan New Orleans area with her husband, who is the model for Big Who in her series, her two daughters, three dogs, and two deaf cats, one of which is featured prominently in Jambalaya Justice.

8 comments:

  1. Excellent post, Patricia! Your books demonstrate your technique, although they flow so well that it's interesting to hear what you do to put them together. It's paid off. Thank you for sharing your process.
    Marja McGraw

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    1. That's high praise coming from you, Marja. Thank you!

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  2. I loved hearing that you afre a plotter because your books read with a freshness I don't usually associate with plotters. I look forward to book 4. Sounds like a great location for your story.

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    1. Thanks, Lesley! I'm very excited about Book 4. I visited Fripp Island several years ago (my book takes place in 2009) and I think it's the perfect setting for my story.

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  3. Oh, wow! I am SO impressed you're a plotter, Patricia, if only because plotting kills the joy of writing for me. It's not that I can't plot, because I can, but if I already know the ending why would I write it?! Of course, being a plotter has huge advantages, and as I said I'm green with envy at your process. Thanks for sharing. Great post!

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    1. Anne, I guess it's kind of like when we were growing up. If we were tall, we wished we were short. If our hair was straight, we wished it were curly. And vice versa.
      I would love to be a pantster!

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  4. I enjoyed reading your responses to the questions. With mysteries, I also think it's important to have a plot outline for the sake of organization.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Jacqueline!
      As you read, I really don't have a choice; I need to have an outline.

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